Three Triptychs

Astrologer
Astrologer

pen and ink and airbrush on drafting vellum

12 x 28 cm

2015-17

Farmer
Farmer

pen and ink and airbrush on drafting vellum

12 x 28 cm

2015-17

Pharmacist
Pharmacist

pen and ink and graphite on drafting vellum

12 x 28 cm

2015-17

Electroluminescense
Electroluminescense

The drawings are backlit by a material called electroluminescence. This material is not an LED, it is a thin flexible layer of phosphor which when stimulated by a high frequency alternating current emits light. The color of the light depends on the color of the phosphor. Each of the triptychs has three panels wired together and are connected to a sensor which detects the presence of someone near the artwork.

 For quite sometime I have been interested in a book called “The Dance of Death”,  composed by Hans Holbein the Younger between 1523 - 1538. The book is a series of woodblock prints and was part of a late-medieval genre called Danse Macabre which focused on the universality of death. This genre can be traced back to 15th century Paris and was produced as a “memento mori”, to remind people of the fragility of their lives and how vain the glories of earthly life are, which is something I have often been addressing in my artwork.

For quite sometime I have been interested in a book called “The Dance of Death”,  composed by Hans Holbein the Younger between 1523 - 1538. The book is a series of woodblock prints and was part of a late-medieval genre called Danse Macabre which focused on the universality of death. This genre can be traced back to 15th century Paris and was produced as a “memento mori”, to remind people of the fragility of their lives and how vain the glories of earthly life are, which is something I have often been addressing in my artwork.

3D design for mounting element
3D design for mounting element

Therefore, the central panel of each triptych is a drawn copy of one image from Holbein’s book. I made these drawings by analyzing high resolution reproductions with Photoshop and taking a lot of measurements. The key to obtaining the level of detail has to do with the materiality of the paper, which due to its surface tension allows a scalpel to scrape the ink, because the drafting vellum does not completely absorb the ink, but rather holds it.

3D printed element
3D printed element

This piece is necessary in order for the panel to remain completely flat, maximizing the slimness of the material.

Wall mount
Wall mount

Using a hollow aluminum tube, with 3D element is then inserted, the wires pass through both and ultimately connect to electroluminescent panel with copper tape terminals.

Beech support
Beech support

Hand made beech support panels for the triptych (back side), with 3D element inserted

Beech support
Beech support

Hand made beech support panels for the triptych (front side), with 3D element inserted flush. Channels were routed out to embed the wires, in order to maintain a totally flat surface

Wall mounts with supports
Wall mounts with supports

The various elements being assembled, prior to mounting the electroluminescent panels.

 Conductive copper tape (at the end of the wires) was used as the terminal connections between the panels and the wires. Electroluminescent panels are very sensitive to the heat generated by a soldering iron.

Conductive copper tape (at the end of the wires) was used as the terminal connections between the panels and the wires. Electroluminescent panels are very sensitive to the heat generated by a soldering iron.

 Conductive copper tape was used to bridge the three electroluminescent panels together, this way all three panels could be lit using just two terminals instead of six.

Conductive copper tape was used to bridge the three electroluminescent panels together, this way all three panels could be lit using just two terminals instead of six.

 Connecting the panels to the wires and then insulating and gluing the panels to the beech wood support.

Connecting the panels to the wires and then insulating and gluing the panels to the beech wood support.

 White light, assembled and turned on, prior to mounting the ink drawings.

White light, assembled and turned on, prior to mounting the ink drawings.

Sensors
Sensors

Testing proximity sensors and transformers, each triptych has a sensor that turns on as long as someone is viewing the piece within a 3m range, after 25 seconds of stillness the piece turns off. The transformers are approximately 100 VAC and 800 HRZ, designed for a specific surface area of electroluminescent panel, in this case 80 square inches.

 The drawings had been made over a year earlier, here I am using a light table to check for any damage to the drawings.

The drawings had been made over a year earlier, here I am using a light table to check for any damage to the drawings.

 I used an airbrush for various parts of the background tones of these pieces, and therefore needed to mask areas. As the artwork is backlit, all brushstrokes become obvious, so the airbrush allows for uniformity. 

I used an airbrush for various parts of the background tones of these pieces, and therefore needed to mask areas. As the artwork is backlit, all brushstrokes become obvious, so the airbrush allows for uniformity. 

Farmer in progress
Farmer in progress

Drawing in progress, I would use a grid and graphite, building it up with fine art markers and scarping away details with needles. Here you can see the advantage of using the airbrush for the sky, it would have been impossible to achieve this with a brush / pencil.

Astrologer in progress
Astrologer in progress

Astrologer, drawing in progress. I used Photoshop's ruler tool extensively to determine proportional lengths and angles in order to reproduce the woodcuts. 

Pharmacist side panels in progress
Pharmacist side panels in progress

Vija Clemens inspired water/blood for the Pharmacist triptych, drawing in progress, pitt oil pencil on drafting vellum.

Three Triptychs
Astrologer
Farmer
Pharmacist
Electroluminescense
 For quite sometime I have been interested in a book called “The Dance of Death”,  composed by Hans Holbein the Younger between 1523 - 1538. The book is a series of woodblock prints and was part of a late-medieval genre called Danse Macabre which focused on the universality of death. This genre can be traced back to 15th century Paris and was produced as a “memento mori”, to remind people of the fragility of their lives and how vain the glories of earthly life are, which is something I have often been addressing in my artwork.
3D design for mounting element
3D printed element
Wall mount
Beech support
Beech support
Wall mounts with supports
 Conductive copper tape (at the end of the wires) was used as the terminal connections between the panels and the wires. Electroluminescent panels are very sensitive to the heat generated by a soldering iron.
 Conductive copper tape was used to bridge the three electroluminescent panels together, this way all three panels could be lit using just two terminals instead of six.
 Connecting the panels to the wires and then insulating and gluing the panels to the beech wood support.
 White light, assembled and turned on, prior to mounting the ink drawings.
Sensors
 The drawings had been made over a year earlier, here I am using a light table to check for any damage to the drawings.
 I used an airbrush for various parts of the background tones of these pieces, and therefore needed to mask areas. As the artwork is backlit, all brushstrokes become obvious, so the airbrush allows for uniformity. 
Farmer in progress
Astrologer in progress
Pharmacist side panels in progress
Three Triptychs

Astrologer

pen and ink and airbrush on drafting vellum

12 x 28 cm

2015-17

Farmer

pen and ink and airbrush on drafting vellum

12 x 28 cm

2015-17

Pharmacist

pen and ink and graphite on drafting vellum

12 x 28 cm

2015-17

Electroluminescense

The drawings are backlit by a material called electroluminescence. This material is not an LED, it is a thin flexible layer of phosphor which when stimulated by a high frequency alternating current emits light. The color of the light depends on the color of the phosphor. Each of the triptychs has three panels wired together and are connected to a sensor which detects the presence of someone near the artwork.

For quite sometime I have been interested in a book called “The Dance of Death”,  composed by Hans Holbein the Younger between 1523 - 1538. The book is a series of woodblock prints and was part of a late-medieval genre called Danse Macabre which focused on the universality of death. This genre can be traced back to 15th century Paris and was produced as a “memento mori”, to remind people of the fragility of their lives and how vain the glories of earthly life are, which is something I have often been addressing in my artwork.

3D design for mounting element

Therefore, the central panel of each triptych is a drawn copy of one image from Holbein’s book. I made these drawings by analyzing high resolution reproductions with Photoshop and taking a lot of measurements. The key to obtaining the level of detail has to do with the materiality of the paper, which due to its surface tension allows a scalpel to scrape the ink, because the drafting vellum does not completely absorb the ink, but rather holds it.

3D printed element

This piece is necessary in order for the panel to remain completely flat, maximizing the slimness of the material.

Wall mount

Using a hollow aluminum tube, with 3D element is then inserted, the wires pass through both and ultimately connect to electroluminescent panel with copper tape terminals.

Beech support

Hand made beech support panels for the triptych (back side), with 3D element inserted

Beech support

Hand made beech support panels for the triptych (front side), with 3D element inserted flush. Channels were routed out to embed the wires, in order to maintain a totally flat surface

Wall mounts with supports

The various elements being assembled, prior to mounting the electroluminescent panels.

Conductive copper tape (at the end of the wires) was used as the terminal connections between the panels and the wires. Electroluminescent panels are very sensitive to the heat generated by a soldering iron.

Conductive copper tape was used to bridge the three electroluminescent panels together, this way all three panels could be lit using just two terminals instead of six.

Connecting the panels to the wires and then insulating and gluing the panels to the beech wood support.

White light, assembled and turned on, prior to mounting the ink drawings.

Sensors

Testing proximity sensors and transformers, each triptych has a sensor that turns on as long as someone is viewing the piece within a 3m range, after 25 seconds of stillness the piece turns off. The transformers are approximately 100 VAC and 800 HRZ, designed for a specific surface area of electroluminescent panel, in this case 80 square inches.

The drawings had been made over a year earlier, here I am using a light table to check for any damage to the drawings.

I used an airbrush for various parts of the background tones of these pieces, and therefore needed to mask areas. As the artwork is backlit, all brushstrokes become obvious, so the airbrush allows for uniformity. 

Farmer in progress

Drawing in progress, I would use a grid and graphite, building it up with fine art markers and scarping away details with needles. Here you can see the advantage of using the airbrush for the sky, it would have been impossible to achieve this with a brush / pencil.

Astrologer in progress

Astrologer, drawing in progress. I used Photoshop's ruler tool extensively to determine proportional lengths and angles in order to reproduce the woodcuts. 

Pharmacist side panels in progress

Vija Clemens inspired water/blood for the Pharmacist triptych, drawing in progress, pitt oil pencil on drafting vellum.

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